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24-Hour Helpline, Linea de Ayuda Voice: 800.332.7385: TTY 800.787.3224

Survivor Resources

Confused, angry, frustrated, terrified, uncertain – these could some of the feelings you are experiencing right now. You should know that all of these feelings are unique to your experience. There is not a right or wrong way to feel when you have experienced domestic violence. Just as there is not “right” way to feel about your experience, there isn’t one set of services that works for every survivor. This page will help guide you in understanding and identifying what set of services will work best for you and your family to move from surviving to thriving.

Who to Call

The following numbers are answered confidentially by a live person 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

24-Hour Statewide Hotline: 800-332-7385

Línea directa estatal de 24 horas: 800-332-7385 Servicios en Español disponible.

For TTY call 800-787-3224

The National Deaf Hotline
855-812-1001 VideoPhone
Open 24 hours/7 days

General Referrals and Information — 221

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Where to Go

Click here to access a map of shelters, transitional housing, counseling, and other services provided throughout Indiana. You can use the Search feature to find services by County, City, Program Name, or Type of Service.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services in US

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Service Descriptions

Residential Program

Residential Program

Has the capacity to safely house and feed domestic violence survivors and their children as well as provide crisis intervention, service needs assessment and provision, information and referral, advocacy, arrange for or provide transportation to shelter within designated service area. Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Nonresidential Program

Nonresidential Program

Provides crisis intervention, information and referral services, support and advocacy, face-to-face services in the community, arrange for transportation to a safe place and/or other services as necessary. Available a minimum of 40 hours a week up to 24 hours a day.

Transitional Program

Transitional Program

Provide long-term housing options for survivors of domestic violence. These programs are often 12-24 months in length.

Batterers’ Intervention Program

Batterers’ Intervention Program

An education-based program that makes survivor safety a primary priority, holds offenders accountable, and promotes a coordinated community response to domestic violence. The goal of a BIP is to provide men who use violence with the opportunity and skills to change the behavior, beliefs, and attitudes that support their use of violence. Certified BIPs work closely with community courts, corrections, and child welfare, and are required to collaborate with service providers to ensure survivors receive supportive services. BIP groups meet on a weekly basis for 26-40 weeks, depending on the program.

 

Satellite Office

Satellite Office

An office in a location separate from the main facility. It does not meet the full definition of a residential or nonresidential facility as it operates less than 40 hours a week in the community and/or does not have access to services 24 hours a day or 7 days a week.

 

Initial Phone Call: When you call a domestic violence program the advocate on the phone to ask you several questions about your experience and family. This isn’t meant to violate your privacy. Advocates ask these questions to gain a sense of the services that you are in need of, how many people in your family need assistance, your level of safety, and if the program is best suited to serve you and/or your family.

Available Services: All domestic violence programs will provide advocacy, case management, skill-building, group processing, and referral assistance. You do not have to reside in shelter to receive the services mentioned above. All programs will provide residential and non-residential services based upon your needs.

  • Residential Program: Has the capacity to safely house and feed domestic violence survivors and their children as well as provide crisis intervention, service needs assessment and provision, information and referral, advocacy, arrange for or provide transportation to shelter within designated service area. Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Nonresidential Program: Provides crisis intervention, information and referral services, support and advocacy, face-to-face services in the community, arrange for transportation to a safe place and/or other services as necessary. Available a minimum of 40 hours a week up to 24 hours a day.

If you are seeking shelter through a residential program, we want you to know some of the things to expect when you go there.

Entering Shelter: We refer to the process of entering shelter as “intake.” This terminology can be off-putting, but it’s just a term we use for the initial meeting you will have with program staff. Depending on the time of day that you enter shelter, this process might happen immediately or a couple hours later. It will be very similar to the Initial Phone Call but a little longer and face-to-face. The purpose of the intake process is to identify what services you will best benefit from, your safety concerns, your immediate needs, and your goals for you and your family. Program staff will work with you if you need to take a break – we know that answering these questions can be difficult. Childcare can be provided so your children don’t have to hangout for the paperwork.

Communal Living: All of the residential domestic violence programs in Indiana are considered communal living. This means that it is very likely you will be sharing space with other people who have experienced violence. Below is helpful information that help prepare you for what to expect about communal living:

  • Shelter rooms vary in size depending on the shelter. On average, there are about 4-6 people/ children in each room.
  • The shelter rooms will have beds/ bedding, dressers, and a bathroom in the room or close by.
  • The shelter will have a kitchen. Larger shelters will often cook group meals for residents. In smaller communities, residents will often share the responsibility of food preparation.
  • The shelter will have community areas with a TV, books, game, and computer(s) for residents and their families.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Resources

Link to DeafALIVE website:  www.deafalive.org

The National Deaf Hotline
855-812-1001 VideoPhone
Open 24 hours/7 days

Aspire Indiana
Deaf Counseling
http://www.aspireindiana.org/deaf-services/

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What to Know

Finding competent and affordable legal assistance can be one of the biggest challenges when you decide to leave an abuser. ICADV offers a number of resources and services that can help.

Self-Help Legal Manual for Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Violence, and Stalking (PDF): This manual is intended to guide you through the basic steps of representing yourself in family court.

Self-Service Legal Center: This website was created to provide valuable information, court forms, and various resources for people who represent themselves in court.

Indiana State Bar Association: For non-emergency situations, find an attorney in your area by contacting the local bar association in your county.

The Immigrant Legal Project is for survivors working with an advocate from a domestic violence program. An advocate needs to complete our referral forms and submit them to ICADV. Referrals are reviewed at ICADV to determine eligibility and provide direct legal assistance in the following areas:

If you are a victim of domestic abuse, you may submit a confidential application to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services to apply for an immigrant visa under the Violence Against Women Act without a fee. This allows you to seek both safety and independence from your abuser, who will not be notified about the filing. The self-petition requires a qualifying relationship to an abuser who is a US citizen or lawful permanent residence. The law applies equally to men and women.

The U visa offers protection for non-citizen victims of certain types of crimes. You are not required to be in a legal immigration status. You do not have to be related or married to a perpetrator of the crime and the perpetrator does not have to be in any specific immigration status. A victim can also apply for certain family members.

T visa provides immigration protection to victims of severe forms of human trafficking.  Trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery.  By federal definition and under federal law, severe form of trafficking in persons has two categories:  sex trafficking or labor trafficking.  Victims are not required to have a legal immigration status. A victim can also apply for certain family members.

If you were granted a conditional resident status through marriage to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, and you are abused by that individual, you may obtain a waiver to remove the conditional status of your permanent residency without the abuser being part of the petition.

Additional Resources

National Domestic Violence Hotline: 800-799-7233       TTY 800-787-3224
http://www.thehotline.org/

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255        TTY 800-799-4889
https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

National Sexual Assault Hotline: 800-656-4673
https://www.rainn.org/

National Child Abuse Hotline: 800-422-4453
https://www.childhelp.org/hotline/

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